There are few more iconic summer activities cheering for the home team while snacking on cotton candy and cracker jack. Going out to a ballgame is more than just watching the play on the field, it’s about experiencing the nation’s past time. Each ballpark has its own unique character and personality, and visiting new stadiums is a great way to understand a new city. We’ve outlined the ten best ballparks to visit this summer.

10. Comerica Park, Detroit

Built in downtown Detroit in 2000, Comerica is a perfect example of a city making a stadium its own. From the stone tigers that guard the entrances, to the dirt stripe between home plate and the pitcher’s mound; Comerica understands it’s the little things that stand out. The stadium also has statues of Tiger greats such as Ty Cobb in right field, letting the history of the Tigers stand out.

On top of this all, plentiful public transportation options and great views of the Detroit skyline make a night at Comerica one to remember.

9. Target Field, Minneapolis

Another Midwestern ballpark, Target Field is a beautiful venue for a ballgame. The park is one of the newest in the Major Leagues, having opened its doors in 2010. It quickly won over fans with its excellent amenities and was named by ESPN magazine as the #1 baseball experience in North America.

The park has an open-air atmosphere while also keeping in mind the region’s climate. It has the league’s only open fire pit in the outfield stands, a perfect place to warm up during cold spring and fall games.

8. T-Mobile Park, Seattle

While the product on the field may be lacking, the home of the Seattle Mariners more than makes up for the team’s lack of success. Built in the retro-style of the early 2000’s, the park offers a clear view of the city skyline with a beautiful stadium design and fully walkable central concourse. The park also features a fully retractable roof to protect against the region’s omnipresent rain.

T-Mobile is also known for having some of the best culinary options in professional spots. Sushi, poke bowls and fried crickets are just some of the unique delicacies on the menu in Seattle.

7. Fenway Park, Boston

Cramped seats, obstructed views, ancient bathrooms, what gets Fenway at #7? History. As one of the oldest ballparks in sports, Fenway has been the sight of many of baseball’s major moments. The park opened in 1912, when ballparks had to adjust their dimensions to match the spaces open in cities. This is evident in Fenway’s outfield.

The left field and right field poles are only 300 feet or so away from home plate. But center field is an incredible 420 feet away from home plate, making straight away home runs immensely difficult. To add to the chaos, the left field wall is 37 feet tall and affectionately called “The Green Monster”.

6. Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City

An example of exceptional stadium design, there’s not a bad seat in Kauffman Stadium. And with one of the largest LED videoboards in sports, you’ll be able to keep track of all the action.

Kauffman also has some of the small things that make up a great ballpark. There’s a fountain in right field, as well as a very walkable concourse that makes for a great place to stretch your legs between innings.

5. Wrigley Field, Chicago

One of the oldest stadiums in sports, Wrigley has a special wonder that comes with watching the Cubs. There’s the ivy-covered brick outfield wall, as well as the hand operated scoreboard. The entrance to the stadium is also iconic and reveals the tradition that backs everything at Wrigley.

While the outfield dimensions might cause fits for the players, the unique features of Wrigley make it a must-see for any baseball fan.

4. Petco Park, San Diego

San Diego might not come to mind when you think of the best ballparks in baseball but Petco Park checks all the boxes. There’s not a bad seat in the house, perfect sunny weather and a unique stadium design that incorporates the abandoned Western Metal Supply Co warehouse in left field.

 

The warehouse has been refurbished and transformed into elevated seats over the field. To top it all off, Petco Park has some of the best dining and customer amenities in baseball.

3. Oracle Park, San Francisco

For the most idyllic setting in sports, it’s hard to beat Oracle Park in San Francisco. The stadium lies at the edge of the waters edge in the bay, with the bay bridge clearly visible from left field. The water is just beyond the seating in right field, making waterborne home runs an exciting reality.

The park also has comfortable seating, amenities and perfect viewing weather with marine breezes cooling down the park.

2. Camden Yards, Baltimore

The ballpark that started it all, Camden Yards was the first ballpark to go back to the classic baseball only seating and design after decades of cookie cutter multi-purpose stadiums. Not only is the park beautiful and stylishly modern, it also incorporates the surrounding urban environment into its design.

The nearby B&O warehouse offers a wall behind right feel and gives it a traditional look in a modern setting. Since the stadium opened in 1992 it’s given rise to a new generation of classically styled baseball ballparks.

1. PNC Park, Pittsburgh

There’s not a better view in baseball than in PNC Park. Just beyond center field is the Roberto Clemente Bridge where you’ll watch late game stragglers enter the park. And just beyond the bridges is the beautiful Pittsburgh skyline.

On game days traffic on the bridge is restricted to pedestrians, making for one of the most beautiful stadium entrances in sports. And to top it off, thanks to excellent design, there’s not a bad seat in the park.

Watch a game at a new stadium this summer for a special summer treat. Book your next baseball vacation through Expedia today!